Kip Moore Biography

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Kip Moore's 2012 CD, Up All Night. Photo courtesy of UMG Nashville.

He drove to Nashville on Jan. 1, 2004 in an old black Nissan truck that contained one bag and his guitar. He immersed himself in the songwriting community, observing songwriters’ rounds for two years and honing his craft before gaining the confidence to join in. After four years of performing locally, he caught the attention of Creative Artist Agency’s Marc Dennis, who called Universal Music Group Nashville’s Joe Fisher. Not only did Joe’s encounter lead to his record deal with MCA Nashville, but it also brought about his introduction to songwriter Brett James, who produced Kip’s debut album.

"Brett gave me the freedom to find who I was as an artist, the freedom for writing a different kind of thing, a different kind of melody and lyric," he says. "He gave me room to grow."

He also found important relationships with songwriters Dan Couch, Scott Steppakoff, Westin Davis and Kiefer Thompson, two of whom didn’t have publishing deals when he began writing with them. "There was definitely a special thing when we got in the room together," Kip says. "I got offers to write with a lot of the bigger guns in town, but I enjoyed what I was doing with them. They were open to my ideas of being different."

And different his debut project is, as evidenced by the album’s first single, "Mary Was the Marrying Kind," the story of the one who got away. The dreamy and spell-binding song is the true story of one of Kip’s friends, who returned to his hometown after about six years and saw the once tall, lanky girl who had since come into her own and become a model.

"It’s the story of what every man in this world goes through at some point," he says. "It’s the story of the one that got away that you should have paid attention to. Every town, every city, everybody knows one. Every girl believes they are Mary."

The anthemic "Drive Me Crazy" is the story of two troubled teens who find a safe harbor in each other, if only for a few fleeting moments. "They are the getaway car for each other from everyday life," he says. "When they’re together, what they live in is in the rear-view mirror and it’s just one big infatuation love story that lasts for a very short time.

With its irresistible bass line and drums, "Up All Night" is about continuing to live life to its fullest. "’Up All Night’ is the story of not wanting to give into your age and how life is supposed to be lived once you reach a certain age," he says.

When Kip plays shows, he’s often asked for advice by aspiring songwriters. "Everybody’s experience is different, but I do believe it has to be the only thing," he says. "I don’t think it can be a gray line. Either you want it and there’s nothing else or it’s not going to happen."

For instance, Kip was offered a sales position with an enticing salary, but it required working six days a week, leaving no time for creating music. "You come to the crossroads: do you really want this? Are you willing to sacrifice everything, including relationships? I can’t tell you how many relationships have been doomed from the get-go because of this.

"It only took me a few minutes to decline it. It’s such a risk and it’s an alone feeling – you feel like you’re on an island by yourself – but it’s worth every single minute. Had I taken that job, I wouldn’t be sitting here today."

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